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Halloween: a Harvest Party

According to several authors, All Hallows’ Eve is a Christianized feast initially influenced by Celtic harvest festivals, with possible pagans roots.

About 2,000 years ago in what is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, lived a group of people called the Celts.  The Celts’ lives revolved around growing their food, and considered the end of the year to be the end of the harvest season.  So, they celebrated new year’s eve each year on October 31st with a festival called “Samhain,” named after their Lord of the Dead (also known as the Lord of Darkness).  This celebration was presided over by Celtic priests called Druids.

Back then, winter was the time of year associated with human death.  The Celts believed that on the night that marked the end of summer and the beginning of winter, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead blurred allowing ghosts of the dead to return to earth.  Celts thought that the presence of the ghosts made it easier for the Druids, their priests, to predict the future.  These predictions were an important source of comfort and direction for the Celts during their long, dark, frightening winters.

To celebrate Samhain, the Druids built huge sacred bonfires around which the Celts gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to their ancient gods.  During the celebration, the Celts dressed up in costumes consisting of animal heads and skins and tried to tell each others fortunes.

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The Christianizing of Halloween

The Celts eventually were conquered by the Romans, and by about the year 43 AD two Roman festivals were combined with the Celtic Samhain festival.  The first Roman festival was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead.  The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees.  The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples practiced today on Halloween.

By 800 AD, the influence of Christianity spread into Celtic lands.  In the seventh century, replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned holiday, Pope Boniface IV designated November 1st as All Saints’ Day, a time to honor saints and martyrs.  The combined and updated celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English “Alholowmesse” meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before it, the night of Samhain, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.

 

 

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Nice Halloween decoration at the Blue Banquet Hall Miami

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Halloween traditions in the United States

Anglican colonists in the South and Catholic colonists in Maryland recognized All Hallow’s Eve in their church calendars although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.

Mass Irish and Scottish immigration during the 19th century increased the holiday’s celebration in the United States.In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside.




Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.

The annual New York Halloween Parade, initiated in 1974 by puppeteer and mask maker Ralph Lee of the Lower Manhattan neighborhood of Greenwich Village in New York City, is the world’s largest Halloween parade and America’s only major nighttime parade, attracting more than 60,000 costumed participants, 2 million in-person spectators, and a worldwide television audience of over 100 million.

So, Halloween is not a devil’s tradition. It became as a harvest party and nowadays it’s a great way of celebrating with friends and family members while having a lot of fun.

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Halloween Party 2014 at the Blue Banquet Hall Miami

Having fun – Halloween at the Blue Banquet Hall Miami

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